Some people preach, “Beauty is in the eye of the beholder,” only to disassociate themselves from others who they deem aren’t good-looking based on societal standards. These conventional standards of beauty are not only outdated and prejudiced, but they are also irrespective of people’s individual differences.

Then, modern society has found a way to permanently alter people’s appearances through science, only for others to gossip about what a person had done and judge them for their individual choices. It seems like no matter what people do, they won’t be able to win against the preconceived notions that others have of them. That’s why it’s better not to care about their opinion at all.

The world has entered the 21st century. People can communicate virtually or order packages from another country over the internet. They could send money to other people with a few clicks on their phones. And billionaires are racing against each other to find a way to send themselves to Mars.

But with all these steps toward progress, it seems like society itself is taking a step backward, especially because so many people are still stigmatizing those who undergo plastic and cosmetic surgeries. It’s immensely hypocritical considering that plenty of those who shame others for getting treatment might even grab at the opportunity if given the chance.

There’s no reason why people can’t change how they look if they are unhappy with it. As long as they’re doing the change for their benefit and no one else’s, they are free to seek out medical aesthetic professionals to look at their treatment options. Besides, it’s more common than you think. Here are some advantages of plastic surgery:

Reconstructive Surgery Helps Patients Adjust Better

When most people hear “plastic surgery,” they might automatically think of boob implants or nose jobs as if the entire field of medicine is dedicated to cosmetic procedures. While those procedures do belong to plastic surgery, it’s not where the list ends.

Plastic surgeons are also in charge of handling burn victims and congenital defects, which both fall under reconstructive surgeries. They help victims and those with birth defects to feel or appear more “normal” after undergoing a traumatic experience. Breast cancer survivors also undergo reconstructions when they get a partial or total mastectomy to deal with their conditions.

Cosmetic surgery may be a luxury for some, but reconstructive surgery is a medical necessity for others because it allows them to get a semblance of normalcy despite their varying situations. Dismissing people simply for getting work done without knowing their story is not only disrespectful but also downright inhumane.

Not All Cosmetic Procedures Are Extreme or Obvious

cosmetic surgery

Most people would think of the worst-case scenario at the mere mention of undergoing plastic surgery. They might think that a person who underwent a procedure will come back looking completely different, or even with breasts as big as watermelons. But not all cosmetic procedures are extreme.

In fact, getting cosmetic procedures is about as normal as getting dental procedures nowadays. However, because not all procedures are news-worthy; only those that are worth mentioning circulate social media, news hubs, and tabloids. That’s why a lot of people tend to associate extreme procedures with the craft.

If cosmetic surgeries are more normalized and accepted by society, then maybe people wouldn’t have to be shocked every time someone they know even thinks about getting something done. At least this way, people could enlarge or reduce their breasts, remove a facial mole, or reshape their nose without anyone so much as batting an eye.

Getting Work Done Helps People Feel More Comfortable in Their Own Skin

With all the societal pressures forced upon people at a young age, it’s not surprising that many individuals feel like they have to adhere to the conventional standards of beauty or else, face being an outcast. So many people struggle with their body image and self-esteem because of these outdated notions of beauty.

And as a reprieve, people tend to lean towards cosmetic surgery in an attempt to feel more comfortable in their own skin. Through these procedures, they could change or improve the parts of themselves that bring about their insecurities and work on bettering their mental health in the process.

However, that could take a turn for the worse if other people start shaming them for choosing to get work done. It’s high time to accept that those who shame or throw shade at the people who underwent the knife to feel better about themselves are simply insecure. Or that they have nothing better to do than projecting their insecurities on other people.

Breaking the stigma towards cosmetic surgeries starts with unraveling the societal standards of beauty. By unlearning these unhealthy notions of how people should look or that they should remain “natural,” maybe society as a whole would become a harmonious community that is accepting of individual differences. But until then, all that you can do is take other people’s opinions with a grain of salt.